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I am trying to model a deformation of a grid with interpollation in the Animation Node, but as you can see I didn't can to use FALLOFF for to get a grid according with 1/r². Can someone help me? is it possible to use an configuration(Falloff) in AN to deform the grid according to the equation enter image description here(-1/r²)?

Equation [-1/(x²+y²)] [enter image description here]2

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  • $\begingroup$ Do you want to use Python to construct the falloff. Because I don't think Animation Nodes allow the creation of custom falloff evaluators using native nodes. $\endgroup$ – Omar Emara Mar 19 '19 at 18:48
  • $\begingroup$ Anything ^^. I have seen in that [link] (blender.stackexchange.com/questions/87390/…) that you model equations through AN. I still do not quite understand the math of visual programming. I realized that you have intimacy with the math of the AN. If you can help me, I'll be grateful. $\endgroup$ – wishmasteregl Mar 22 '19 at 15:17
  • $\begingroup$ So you are just looking for a way to visualize this equation using AN? Is there a reason why you can't do it as I explained in the answer you linked? $\endgroup$ – Omar Emara Mar 22 '19 at 16:26
  • $\begingroup$ I will try. The falloff allows a dynamic with the grid, that is, the movement of the empty in the space deforming the grid, while the modeling of the mesh in the other link is static. What I need is to link an object to mesh and as the object moves in space the mesh becomes deformed. Like this link: youtube.com/watch?v=segQy1UKV6U $\endgroup$ – wishmasteregl Mar 23 '19 at 2:41
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Falloffs in Animation Nodes are mostly hard-coded, that is, you need to write cython/python code to create a custom falloff. So it is much easier to compute the effect you are after manually. A simple implementation of grid deformation is as follows:

Node Tree

Want to transform it based on an empty? Simply subtract the location of the empty from the x and y of your equations:

Result

Want to scale it? Similarly multiply the scale of the empty to the x and y of the equation.

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  • $\begingroup$ Incredible Omar. Thank you again. I followed his work on squircleart. Want to go back with squircleart? $\endgroup$ – wishmasteregl Mar 23 '19 at 12:32
  • $\begingroup$ @wishmasteregl I took down the site. And probably won't bring it back. However, all of the information that was there is/will be available in Stackexchange, official documentations, and Wikipedia. So no information was lost in the process. Let me know if you need anything. $\endgroup$ – Omar Emara Mar 23 '19 at 13:54

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