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I could not find anything like what I'm thinking, though it is hard to search for 'snapping' without getting a lot of mixed results.

What I'm looking for is an add-on or behavior where the vertices of your mesh form an implicit 3D grid system, so that you can snap to the closest grid planes automatically.

Example: Given a usual triangle, say you want to move the bottom right vertex to the top of the triangle (only z). You move that corner vertex upwards and once it aligns with the top vertex in the z-axis, it would snap to that z-value.

Most of the snapping I've seen is to the vertex/edge/face itself, this is more snap to align with closest.

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I'm not completely sure if I understand your question, but this is how I would go about your example.

Example: Given a usual triangle, say you want to move the bottom right vertex to the top of the triangle (only z). You move that corner vertex upwards and once it aligns with the top vertex in the z-axis, it would snap to that z-value.

  • select the bottom right vertex of the triangle;
  • switch snapping mode to 'vertex, closest, move';
  • press g to move the vertex;
  • press z to lock the z axis;
  • hold control to enable snapping while moving;
  • move the cursor to the top vertex of the triangle.

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ For this simple example, that works, but I was looking for something that didn't require constraining the axis, since for example, I wouldn't be able to snap to 2 alignments this way. This should tide me over for now though. $\endgroup$ – Karric Mar 5 at 0:22
  • $\begingroup$ @Karric if you want to move vertex along some direction which is not the standard world axis, you could create a custom transform orientation (this effectively creates a custom axis) and move vertex along it using the same technique. If you'd like, I can upload another gif for you. However, it would be better if you could set out another example which would answer your question in full. $\endgroup$ – seethesky Mar 5 at 4:24

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