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I am quite new to Blender, but I have already gone through a couple of tutorials.

Now have finally started making a scene myself, lamps and indoor HDRIs works fine, but when I use outdoor HDRIs (from Poliigon) I seem to do something wrong because everything gets extremely overexposed. I cannot see the textures on the ground or even the shadows.

Example of what I mean: enter image description here

Same scene but with a studio HDRI: enter image description here

I suppose I have just forgot some simple detail, but I can't seem to find the source of this issue.

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Use some math nodes to turn down that brightness. For an HDRI like that, all you should need to do is multiply the value down to where the sun seems to be at a normal brightness, and then add usually 1-2 back for sky lighting. enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ I tried this solution, but even when I multiply the value with such a low value as 0.0001 the scene still looks extremely overexposed. It did help a little bit however as I now can see shadows, but it is still no where near the preview image that came with the HDRI $\endgroup$ – TheZazern Mar 1 at 20:03
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    $\begingroup$ Just use the strength slider for the environment texture: blender.stackexchange.com/a/69615/1853 $\endgroup$ – cegaton Mar 1 at 20:04
  • $\begingroup$ See also: blender.stackexchange.com/questions/113908/… $\endgroup$ – cegaton Mar 1 at 20:04
  • $\begingroup$ Ah yes! I followed that first answer and tweaked the strength and film exposure of the scene which fixed the problem. Thanks a lot! I just have a kind of off-topic question. Why is the lighting of these outdoor HDRIs so strong to begin with when studio HDRIs aren't (from my limited experience)? $\endgroup$ – TheZazern Mar 1 at 20:35
  • $\begingroup$ Probably because the sun is way brighter than the lights on a photo studio. HDRs if done properly will contain the light ratios of their original scenes. So you can imagine that a source as bright as the sun is hard to reproduce indoors. $\endgroup$ – cegaton Mar 1 at 21:00

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