1
$\begingroup$

First visit to the forums so hope I am in the right place to ask this question.

I have created a few projects as I get more familiar with some of what Blender has to offer.

I am seeking the best way to tidy up the ends of extruded lines when they intersect. I have added an image to help show what I mean. Basically to have the ends terminate within the enclosing boundary rather than poking through as they are. The extruded shapes are bezier curves if that helps?

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Do you want to finish up with a contiguous (manifold) surface? or just hide the open ends? $\endgroup$ – Robin Betts Jan 23 at 11:20
  • $\begingroup$ Hello Robin, Many thanks for taking the time to respond. I am looking for the ends to be not protruding through the supporting curve. As each of the struts are meeting the curve at different points in the curve then each of them requires a different cropping so that they don't protrude through the outer surface of the supporting curve. Hope that this makes sense? $\endgroup$ – Tonzodehoo Jan 24 at 0:52
0
$\begingroup$

You can create a weight paint at the ends, and assing that vertex group to a skinwrap modifier.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Sounds intriguing! Unintelligible to an amateur like me but intriguing none the less. Thanks for your input! $\endgroup$ – Tonzodehoo Jan 23 at 9:35
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ It is a good idea using shrinkwrap on the end edge loop to project onto the target tube. Can you please elaborate on the answer. As commented above if you are unfamiliar with the concepts its "unintelligible" $\endgroup$ – batFINGER Jan 23 at 12:10
  • $\begingroup$ Hello, Thanks for your response. I am afraid I am unfamiliar with the terminology which is why it was a bit unintelligible to me. I am a newbie with Blender. I have been trying a few ways to achieve what I want and am learning a lot about blender through the process but this particular issue is one which I am not yet finding a resolution to which is why I was seeking to consult with those who know so much more. $\endgroup$ – Tonzodehoo Jan 24 at 0:58
  • $\begingroup$ I should add for clarity that the straight sections are bezier curves straightened out and extruded with a radius and depth applied. I have tried converting it to a mesh and then modifying it from there but its not a very tidy method of working using the knife tool. I am still trying things so am not just sitting hoping someone may come along with a solution. However if anyone has any relevant video clips or support documents that may help in enlightening me then that would be great. $\endgroup$ – Tonzodehoo Jan 24 at 8:44
  • $\begingroup$ Can I also say that if I am missing a really obvious solution to this then forgive me. I am here to learn! $\endgroup$ – Tonzodehoo Jan 24 at 10:12
0
$\begingroup$

AFAIK, there's no way of trimming Curves natively in Blender, (cutting a spline, and recalculating the parameters to approximate the intact spline.) It can be done outside, at least in Adobe Illustrator, I don't know about others.

Inside Blender, I think you have to go via a mesh representation... something like this...

enter image description here

  • In Object Mode, AltC, convert the stock curves to a mesh, and CtrlE > 'Bridge Edge Loops'

enter image description here

  • Raise the trimming curve above the mesh in, say, Z..
  • In Object mode, select the cutter, then the stock, making it active, put it into Edit Mode.
  • Looking down Z, Knife Project the cutter onto the stock, with 'Cut Through' checked.
  • In face mode CtrlI invert the selection of faces, and X delete.
  • In edge mode, CtrlAlt select a vertical ring of edges, and in the Select header menu , Select Loops > Edge Loops.. check for edges not caught by the loop selection..

enter image description here

  • P part a duplicate of the edge selection to a new object, and AltC convert back to a curve.

I may have missed a trick or two.. and would expect your situation to be slightly different anyway...

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Oops.. if your question was just about trimming the ends of curves which already fit, then converting to mesh and Knife Project may be enough. $\endgroup$ – Robin Betts Jan 24 at 12:13
0
$\begingroup$

Well after a bit of hacking and tweaking I think I have learned a lot through this exercise. So basically I converted the curve to a mesh then used the knife tool as suggested and then had to delete the extraneous material. It was I guess more obvious now than it was at the start of the process. It was a bit footer due to the location of the parts and the shapes involved but a lesson learned.

many thanks for those that offered other solutions. Its good to know there is support out there as one wades through the endless possibilities of blender.

Best wishes.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.