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enter image description here

This room is currently lit, with a sun light and to a large part by the resulting bounce light.

I currently like the amount of bounce light, and how it shapes the light in the room.

BUT:

I want to reduce the brightness of the directly lit areas.

So i can whats happening in the areas that are directly lit.

Like that: (reduced sun-srength)

enter image description here

Is there a way to reduce the brightness of directly lit areas without reducing my sun-strength ?

Yes im usic the Filmic colour space.

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You could render it with passes enabled and reconstruct the image with compositing. You then have the control of how much direct or indirect light you add to the compositing result:

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ you are my hero. I knew this had to be an essentiell feature. Thanks so much :) $\endgroup$ – Jens Clar Jan 10 at 1:12
  • $\begingroup$ this doesnt allow for denoising tho :( and since im doing an animation im kind of reliant on it $\endgroup$ – Jens Clar Jan 10 at 8:10
  • $\begingroup$ It is possible to de-noise with nodes. Since Blender's de-noising isn't something miraculous I think one can achieve similar results with Bilateral Blur node used on noisy passes. That would even have some benefits - de-noising after render is complete, so less experimentation, also does not need to use as much memory at render time with big tiles. But that's another question. $\endgroup$ – Martin Z Jan 10 at 9:29
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The easiest way is using some post-processing in the blender's compositor. There are nodes there like curves, color balance, which can easily isolate the highlights. Consider that in the compositor you have your "overexposed" areas really bright, but not clipped, because of 32 bit pixel color range, so you can map your colors along with the filmix mapper the way you want.
Also to isolate highlights you can use direct render passes being separated, darkened, and then combined back to the resulting image.
And another way is to cheat the renderer itself, with no compositor. You can add to your scene another sun, almost the same as your main sun, with the same settings, but make it to emit darkness instead of light. Setting its energy to a negative value will do the trick. And to keep the scene's indirect light unaffected, you have to set Max Bounces for this dark sun to zero.
Here is how it looks like. (no dark sun; 50% darkness; 80% darkness respectively):
no darkness50%80%

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