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To learn more about Blender Physics, I've developed a scenario that encompasses what I want to be able to achieve.

GOAL

Something like rubbery taffy is stretched out from a post, around a sharp corner, then rolled onto a stick, overlapping itself.

The taffy will not have a consistent cross section, it is randomly irregular.

Some important physics details:

  1. When the taffy interacts with the sharp corner, it flattens a bit like it would in real life. Otherwise maintains volume.
  2. When the taffy is rolled onto the stick, it self-collides and doesn't clip.
  3. The taffy is under tension (stretched out); I might animate the stick moving around, so tension would vary.
  4. Gravity should act on the whole suspended portion to cause droop.

From other videos, it seems baking + tweaking is common, but I would prefer a pure simulation approach (no intervention), even if it's really slow.

PROGRESS

So far I've tried to use cloth physics, but there's no volume preservation, and it clips through the corners of the block.

enter image description here

I'm using 2.79, but if 2.8 is better for this, I can switch.

Any direction or reference to good resources would be appreciated. I have uploaded my file below.

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  • $\begingroup$ Could you share the blend file? $\endgroup$ – Mike GO Dec 22 '18 at 16:53
  • $\begingroup$ @MikeGO - What file uploader would you recommend? $\endgroup$ – Karric Dec 22 '18 at 18:23
  • $\begingroup$ @MikeGO - I have uploaded the file. $\endgroup$ – Karric Dec 23 '18 at 12:44
  • $\begingroup$ For preserving volume you can add internal structure to the mesh as described in blender.stackexchange.com/a/130365/29586 but I think the stretching will be beyond the capabilities of the Soft Body simulation - the stretching forces will be far too extreme to result in a stable simulation. $\endgroup$ – Rich Sedman Jan 30 at 22:48

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