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Any idea what's causing these two white blotches? They don't appear in the viewport render. enter image description here

here's a viewport screen capture,

enter image description here

and here's a render with the spotlight (that's located behind the model) hidden and only an HDRI for lighting, they still appear, and appear to be literal white squares in clusters.

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ Not really sure, too hard to tell just from the image. It almost looks like 2 spot lights being reflected on a very shinny surface. You might want to upload blend file for further help $\endgroup$ – icYou520 Dec 17 '18 at 23:04
  • $\begingroup$ Are you using denoising? $\endgroup$ – cegaton Mar 7 at 7:45
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Reducing the render samples might help. Here is an example.

Rendered with 64 samples. enter image description here enter image description here

Rendered with 16 samples. enter image description here enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Slightly changing the camera angle(Z-axis for the best) is another choice to erase white block artifacts. I think the cause is probably relative to the vertical viewing angle of some sharp faces, which leads to fake light bouncing calculation(like division by zero error). And that's why reducing render samples might also help. $\endgroup$ – Scorpio Simba Mar 8 at 9:17
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I've been experiencing this as well; when it happens to me, it's occurring in geometry where there's a degenerate or zero-area face (e.g. take a polygon and scale it to 0 in two dimensions, so it's just a couple of lines occupying the same space), and the material applied to it has a normal map. If Depth of Field is turned off, it shows up as pure white pixels occurring randomly along the line; with it on, they're either small white squares or small white circles. (And if Bloom is also turned on, it looks like J.J. Abrams came by and dropped a massive lens flare into my scene.)

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It happens when a face is collapsed between two edges/verts. say you have 3 planes in one object, that are connected (like a tetris piece).If you select the left plane and move it in the x toward the right plane, squishing the middle plane to zero, and leaving only the left and right plane visible, the middle plane normal map renders as white blobs. The zero plane answer by shipbrook is correct. figured I'd put it in layman's terms.

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    $\begingroup$ Rather than paraphrasing @Shipbrook 's answer, consider upvoting it. $\endgroup$ – batFINGER Mar 5 at 1:53

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