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I have a weird issue with an image texture. I'm attempting to put a logo on a golf ball,What it should look like,

but the image itself is being duplicated, reversed and enlarged on the opposite side of the object.enter image description here

Tried deleting everything but the golf ball object, and starting over, but it's doing the same thing. Just started doing this when I changed the logo size. Only happens with the logo png file, which I have deleted and remade multiple times.

Here are the nodes.enter image description here

Here is the uv map.enter image description here

Any Ideas?

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  • $\begingroup$ Please show an image of you work with a Blender Screen capture. Select an image to show your texture settings and UV Map. Please do this for all future questions. $\endgroup$ – atomicbezierslinger Dec 11 '18 at 20:33
  • $\begingroup$ Do you have a UV Map? Please show the UV Map? $\endgroup$ – atomicbezierslinger Dec 11 '18 at 20:36
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It seems like you've unwrapped the object with one of the "project from view" options. This means your UV map is just a flattened version of your mesh; the faces on the far side overlap the faces on the near side, and so end up bearing a reversed version of whatever image you position there.

A simple workaround is to select the faces you don't want to texture, then (in the UV editor) scale their UV mapping to 0 (S0) and tuck them away in the corner somewhere.

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Ok, I tried a different UV map unwrap, and it worked this time. Not sure why, but that fixed the problem.

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  • $\begingroup$ You can safely skip understanding every single correction. If the problem happened 8 times in a row costing millions of dollars then I would be concerned. Some problems are big. Some are small. This is small ... so far. $\endgroup$ – atomicbezierslinger Dec 11 '18 at 22:18
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  • Create one or more seams and create an inspect the UV Map.
  • When painting make sure to view the UV Map with the active texture so you can see what succeeds to meet your goal and what fails.
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  • $\begingroup$ I don't think anything was said about painting. I think he was talking about an image texture. $\endgroup$ – Martin Z Dec 11 '18 at 20:51

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