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When creating a topology mesh, are self intersecting loops a problem ?

If it is problematic, you can use "Paint" to communicate and mark how that edge should have been made with a simple stroke.

Self Intersecting Edge Loops Image: The edge loop forms a fish shape on eyes.

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    $\begingroup$ Would you rate yourself as beginner, or intermediate, or advanced at topology? $\endgroup$ Dec 11, 2018 at 7:04
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    $\begingroup$ I suggest you see a few short tutorials on facial organic topology. I think you would benefit from seeing a collection of fundamentals. $\endgroup$ Dec 11, 2018 at 7:10
  • $\begingroup$ I have seen a retopology tutorial on youtube. But i am a beginner. That's why i ask if self intersections are a problem in edge loops. Everyone in youtube, skips answering this question. Therefore it needs an answer, to not leave "gaps" in knowledge. $\endgroup$ Dec 11, 2018 at 7:13
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    $\begingroup$ You want to have the edge loops perpendicular or aligned with the direction of movement/the alignment of the (facial) muscles. The ring muscle around the eye should be supported with multiple loops. The mask loop is a matter of preference and is often discard. Self intersecting loops probably are not the best solution, spirals most definitely not. $\endgroup$
    – Leander
    Dec 11, 2018 at 7:17
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    $\begingroup$ I have to clarify that though. The white stroke (mask) is optional it could also be yet another ring around the eye. The outermost eyerings would then be connect with a small bridge over the nose. This model uses a mask and this doesn't. The both have similiar edge flow. This means that the lower crossing loop on the nose (which could flow around the eye and connect between the eyebrows) are directied past the eye to the back of the head. $\endgroup$
    – Leander
    Dec 11, 2018 at 7:46

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The answer was given by Leander in the comments section:

  • You cant use Self Intersecting loops, that's a novice mistake.
  • Instead use "Mask Topology".

Mask Topology

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    $\begingroup$ You make it sound as if it is a rule carved in stone. It is not. It is better not to use them. It is easier to work with the mesh if they aren't there, and in your specific example other kind of topology might be more optimal, but if you want to or have a reason to use them, there is no problem there if there is no problem there. It is definitely not a 'noob mistake'. It's just better not to use them in this narrow context of modelling smooth faces. Not a big deal. It depends on the form of the thing you are modelling. Not a rule. $\endgroup$ Dec 12, 2018 at 7:44
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Direct sugggestion ..... Do not use the self intersecting mesh you have. Correct it or Discard it.

If you feel you are a beginner at topology I suggest you not experiment too much or any ... with quad flow. I believe your model to use uncommon edge flow. Thus I think you would do better in the long run not to use the quad flow you have in your question. Follow a common and trusted model.

If you choose to improve your mesh by your own standards after consulting videos with many upvotes consider the following.

  • You may discard your current model and get a fresh start.
  • You may correct or add improvements to your mesh. If you attempt to correct your model see the Blender feature of

    • rotate edge
  • What is written here is not a tutorial. A video does that better. Of course I am tempted to say more ... about edge loops. But then again the dangerous tutorial pops up. Your model has other problems which you can correct sooner or later.

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The important thing is to know why some topologies are preferable and in which situations. The reason that topology is so important especially for faces, shoulders, elbows, knees etc is animation.

When the mesh stretches and bends, good topology will ensure that no strange artefacts appear on the surface. If your model is not supposed to be animated then perfect topology is not that important.

One way to check if your topology is working is to add a subsurface modifier or similar to smooth out the surface and then select parts of your mesh to stretch and rotate. Don't worry about it looking perfectly real, just look for lighting artefacts and oddities. The more you can stretch and bend your mesh without artefacts the better. Most topology problems show up when you rotate parts of the mesh.

Also, try not to discard models. It is good to learn how to rework parts that didn't turn out the way you wanted. It will make you a better and more efficient modeler.

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