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I've searched a bunch and found numerous fixes for non-manifold geometry but none of them seem to be working with my design. Can anyone help? The plan is to 3D print this object.

Blender File Download

Thanks, Ryan

Non-manifold Geometry

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In edit mode press K and use the knife tool to cut edges across geometry and make 4 sided faces.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks Luddens. I was able to correct the non-manifold edges by making a new face at the 4 internal vertices that made up the left and right side of the part of the design with the protrusions. However I still have 4 intersecting faces, 6 non-flat faces, and 2 thin faces. Working on correcting them. Should the large flat face with ngons be broken up into 4 sided faces as well? Wouldn't this just complicate the design further? Apologies for my naïveté...I'm new to this. $\endgroup$ – Ryan Dec 3 '18 at 2:23
  • $\begingroup$ When doing 3D, you really always want to have 4 sided faces. It's become a little bit more lax under certain situations like sculpting, but it's still a thing you need to worry about, because above I think 5 sides it's impossible to really determine where the edges inserted will flow, and you can dump a ton of work on yourself in the future. See, the object you have there, I'm assuming you're not printing it like that, right? That's just a low resolution model that you're going to upres, subdivide, then print, right? $\endgroup$ – Jude Desir Dec 3 '18 at 3:59
  • $\begingroup$ I actually had no idea of good workflow going into this, so I'm learning now that I've created a bunch of work for myself. I think I really need to get out of Blender and into a program geared more towards 3D printing. Thanks for all the help. $\endgroup$ – Ryan Dec 4 '18 at 14:28
  • $\begingroup$ Blender is really great for 3D printing, especially if you don't want to pay for the software. If you really want to do any kind of 3D for anything these days, you should try to familiarize yourself with the concept of 'hard surface modeling.' That means you can take 3D geometry, and build realistic surfaces using polygon modeling fundamentals, extrude, bevel, edge splitting, using support loops, sub dividing, etc. Go on youtube or CG cookie and look up 'hard surface modeling' or 'hard surface fundamentals' $\endgroup$ – Jude Desir Dec 4 '18 at 20:12

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