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How would you approach the modeling of a shape like this (circled in red)?

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The goal is to have a model for CNC. I am still quite weak with modeling so I am not sure about how to address this. What I did for now has been extruding the shape vertex by vertex, trying to keep only quads, adjust the Z of some of them, adjust the crease and apply a Subsurf modifier.

How would you do this? Please without sculpting.

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  • $\begingroup$ hello, it's not clear what it is, is it just a decorative pattern like a leaf? do you have other pictures of the same object? and don't you try to sculpt the whole thing as one object? $\endgroup$ – moonboots Oct 17 '18 at 8:47
  • $\begingroup$ Hi, yes it's a decorative pattern for a frame, here's a complete picture drive.google.com/file/d/12asJ6XJN97kbZKppceS51UiR6Mm4zZ5I/…. I will have to do it all (well actually 1/4 and then use mirror modifier). Unfortunately my knowledge of sculpting is zero. $\endgroup$ – Alberto89 Oct 17 '18 at 9:06
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    $\begingroup$ This might be totallyy offtopic, but I wanted to throw in that most CNC drilling machines work on CAD data, which is produced by NURBS modeling. (think the same difference of pixel art against vector art) So before remodeling this like you do, you should be certain that you can even use the outcome. In fact, I would model it almost just as you did... $\endgroup$ – morph3us Oct 17 '18 at 9:43
  • $\begingroup$ Yes you are right but there are also software that can produce gcode from meshes, like Vectric Aspire. Anyway I specified with the client that the outcome will be an STL. $\endgroup$ – Alberto89 Oct 17 '18 at 10:16
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Alberto, I'm not sure to see exactly the same thing as you, but anyway here is how I would do it. First I show how I would correct your own topology so that you can have a curved face. And also it looks like there's a slot in the middle of a face, so I also tried it.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks, this shows that in the general approach I was on the correct path, plus it adds some useful information:) $\endgroup$ – Alberto89 Oct 18 '18 at 9:56

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