0
$\begingroup$

At the top of my walls, I want to angle them in and then sit a ceiling on top. To do this, I'm selecting each wall indvidually and extruding a portion upwards then dragging the top face into the room area a bit.

The end result is this:

enter image description here

I have quite a few individual wall sections to do...

enter image description here

I'm sure there must be a better and faster way of doing this. What's a better way to go about it instead of tackling each wall section indvidually?

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

There are a few ways to do this. My personal choice is to use a curve representing the wall shape as the bevel object for another curve representing the floor plan.

  1. Create a mesh object with the outline of the wall shape you want to use, such as thiswall shape
  2. Convert it to a curve (ALT-C -> Curve from Mesh)
  3. Create a floor plan and convert it to a curve, such as thisfloor plan
  4. Use the wall shape as the bevel object for the floor planWalls

You can create the curves directly if you prefer and you can convert the beveled curve to a mesh (ALT-C -> curve to mesh) so that you can modify it.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Alternately you can extrude the wall shape to make the solid object, but I find the floor plan approach easier to control. $\endgroup$ – Marty Fouts Sep 15 '18 at 16:29
0
$\begingroup$

Normally, the whole was would be one mesh object, unless it was something that clearly stood out to be a seperate piece. What you can do is to join them all, and select the top face. Then, change the pivot point to individual origins, and change the transform orientation to Normal. Then, you can drag them all in.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.