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So I'm ripping models from a mobile game and when I import them into Blender there are always nodes and often lines like these that appear. What I want to know is what they are, their purpose and if it would be better if I kept them to help me rig this model.

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ They look like empties, but the could be meshes as well. It's hard to say from the picture, but if you look at the outliner, you shoul have that info from the object's icon. We can't say much more if you don't add further information. Are the object's parented tho them? What about their locations? $\endgroup$
    – Carlo
    Aug 20, 2018 at 1:28

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The objects with the lines are blender objects that are called empties. They represent a single point and orientation in space, and are generally used as a marker for something else.

In this case, looking at their positions, I would guess that your importer is importing the bones in the mesh as empties, so these actually mark the bone positions. If this is the case you will probably see that many of the empties are parented to each other in a similar hierarchy as bones would be.

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  • $\begingroup$ That would make sense. Would there be any way to convert the empties to bones automatically or would I have to do it manually? $\endgroup$
    – Lee
    Aug 20, 2018 at 20:38
  • $\begingroup$ @Lee It would probably not be hard to script if you are familiar with that. Otherwise you could look to see if you can convert the file type in an external program and then import a different type into blender. Out of interest, what is the file type? $\endgroup$
    – Sazerac
    Aug 21, 2018 at 1:04
  • $\begingroup$ The rippped files are ascii fbx files. I open them in the mixed reality viewer (the one that comes with windows 10) and from there save it as a binary fbx file. $\endgroup$
    – Lee
    Aug 21, 2018 at 17:00
  • $\begingroup$ @Lee fbx should be able to work, although there are many versions with minor differences so it can sometimes be tricky. You could try a different program to convert the ascii one to binary, like the autodesk one: autodesk.com/developer-network/platform-technologies/… $\endgroup$
    – Sazerac
    Aug 22, 2018 at 1:13
  • $\begingroup$ I tried it, but I think Blender couldn't read the files. $\endgroup$
    – Lee
    Aug 22, 2018 at 16:25

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