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So i have some cords that plug into a socket. the socket plugs into the hammer head, and I want to smooth the connection between the socket and hammer head so it doesn't look like they are intersecting. I have tried using a boolean union but it does not give the desired result, and gives shading issues. Sculpting isn't working out, it just gives it a bumpy look and its not smooth no matter how much i lower the level of detail or add subsurf. The topology of the hammer head and the socket are completely different, so is their any other way to do this? enter image description here

Here is my reference: enter image description here

See the part where the socket is smoothed and combined into the hammer head? I want to make it smooth with that connection. enter image description here

EDIT: Still haven't fixed the problem, even after using below two methods. Maybe there is a sculpting method?

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    $\begingroup$ Could you draw some lines and/or arrows on your image? I think of a hammer as a tool to drive nails with and I don't see one of those here. As a result I have no idea what you are trying to accomplish. $\endgroup$ – Dontwalk May 31 '18 at 15:08
  • $\begingroup$ there we go I added it $\endgroup$ – cgperfect May 31 '18 at 16:53
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    $\begingroup$ I think this should perfectly answer your question: topologyguides.com/post/163096515095/decals $\endgroup$ – cgslav May 31 '18 at 23:34
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If you really want to avoid actually connecting the two meshes, you can use this custom shader by the community:

Shader: Rounded edge between the two intersecting faces?

Although best practice (and what you see in your reference) would be to just connect them with a boolean or similar operation and clean up the mesh afterwards.

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If you want to smooth them together you are going to have to connect the meshes, this can be done without boolean.

  1. ctrl F > knife intersect and delete the internal mesh on both.
  2. select all the points int he area and ctrl V > remove doubles (this will connect the meshes.)
  3. with the points you want to smooth selected go into the tools menu and select smooth vertex.
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  • $\begingroup$ Did not work, it only ruined my topology and created a huge hole in my hammer head $\endgroup$ – cgperfect May 31 '18 at 18:07
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    $\begingroup$ Post a picture so i can see why it didnt work. Ive used this method many times before when boolean is misbehaving $\endgroup$ – zander May 31 '18 at 18:10
  • $\begingroup$ Is there any other way to do this? This is sort of confusing for me $\endgroup$ – cgperfect May 31 '18 at 18:17
  • $\begingroup$ I should add that when you knife intersect u only select one of the intersecting pieces $\endgroup$ – zander May 31 '18 at 18:19
  • $\begingroup$ I delete the face that is at the end of the socket, then i go to the hammer and knife around the circle shape, then I remove doubles and nothing happens. $\endgroup$ – cgperfect May 31 '18 at 18:20
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I think this can be done nicely with a shrinkwrap modifier on a vertex group and then using a data transfer modifier to blend the normals so it looks like a smooth connection.

This video explains that in detail:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=luFz5gzvM9s&t=289s

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Since its a Gaming asset as per the visuals, I would suggest you to soften the Normals of those ares when you are making the PBR textures that would be much easy and even you can darken a bit at the point of intersection so that it adds more feel to it. OR Still if you want to make changes into your model only then simply add few loops and scale up the tip of those "cords" so that it makes up a smooth kind of transition from proper straight(Straight tip or end of cord) to proper flat part of your hammer .

Note- By scaling the tip I mean the part which is intersection with the hammer and it must be at a zoomed level so that when zoomed out the transition must look more natural.

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  • $\begingroup$ Can you add some detailed instructions and screenshots to help others understand what you are talking about? $\endgroup$ – Scott Milner Dec 27 '18 at 17:24

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