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This might be a simple fix, however I have never done close up stills or animations before.

I just started building a logo animation for the company I work for. Barely even getting around to animating anything, I have noticed that a "circular shadow" seems to be following the camera. I have tried turning off the lights, it doesnt modify the shadow in any way.

I've tried researching the issue to no avail. I might be searching in the wrong places, but have not found anything related to it yet.

Below are a couple low quality stills for reference. Has anybody encountered this before? Am I missing something basic?

enter image description here

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ I am not sure what to make of these images. The camera certainly has no shadow and at least the border you pointed out with the upper arrow in the first image looks like the reflection of a plane used for lighting. Can you upload your file somewhere (i.e. at pasteall.org/blend ) so we can check your settings? If you are not allowed to upload stuff of your company to official sites, an example file that shows the problem is good, too. $\endgroup$ – maddin45 May 24 '14 at 23:28
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for your reply @maddin45. I just got back in the office and have uploaded a youtube video demonstrating the issue, and an example blend file. Any help is greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance. Blend file: pasteall.org/blend/29479 Youtube: youtu.be/4zJn048RQLE $\endgroup$ – theBrokenVerticie May 27 '14 at 19:38
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The problem seems to be that the normals of the two faces that connect the horizontal bars of the letter E are pointing into the opposite direction as the rest of the front facing part of the E.
enter image description here

Make sure the normals of your meshes are consistent (meaning that the normals of two neighboring faces are pointing to the same side of the volume, optimally outside). The normals are used for lighting calculations. Since the direction of the normals is inconsistent over the front of the E, the lighting calculations generate artifacts.
Do you really need these faces? They make the E look like a block. If not you can delete them.
Otherwise you need to flip the normals of the faces or separate the faces from the rest of the mesh. You can flip the normals by selecting the two faces and clicking the Flip Direction button in the toolbar to the right side of the 3D view. If the toolbar is not visible press [T] while your mouse cursor is in the 3D view.
enter image description here

The result should look like this:
enter image description here

To separate the faces instead select them and press [Y]. Both methods ensure the normals of the E are consistent on the front face:
enter image description here

In general you should avoid non-manifold meshes. A mesh is called non-manifold if an edge connects more than two faces. Just imagine your mesh was made out of a rubber sheet. If you can cut out a region around any edge and find a way to press it flat onto the table without faces overlapping, your mesh is manifold and you are ready for production.
If you have a manifold mesh, Blender can even calculate the normals for you: Go into editmode, select the faces whose normals you want to calculate and press [Ctrl+N] to calculate the outwards facing normals or [Ctrl+Shift+N] to calculate the normals facing inside.

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