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In Cinema 4D you can select an animated keyframe and just slide to move it directly from the timeline and all attributes like scale, rotation, position etc will be automatically adjusted to the new position.

Is there anyway to do that in Blender? Right now the only method I see is to select all attributes from the dope sheet and move them manually. This adds extra steps that can get gruesome later.

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    $\begingroup$ Hi @00Ghz can you please choose an answer you want to accept? So this question will be marked as answered. Thanks! $\endgroup$ – Polosson Feb 25 '16 at 13:06
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It is not possible to move keyframes directly in the timeline window.

But in the dopesheet, you can select all the keyframes of an animated object at once, by click the top one, in the master channel :

enter image description here

You can still box select with B like @Cosifa said, and move, scale, or duplicate them.

Edit: Oh! and you can always re-arrange your window panes as you want, to suits your needs if you want a big 3D view and a little dopesheet window at the bottom screen ;)

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Because we can't manage keyframe in timeline, I often use the dopesheet as a timeline to scrub in, with Summary button active. The Summary channel is easily accessed when minimized, and each time we need finer grained, per-channel tweaking, just resize the dopesheet's space. I reserve a smaller timeline space for changing start and end-frame, but otherwise the dopesheet is perfectly fine doubling as timeline.

workspace

Blender have various selection methods. Ones I often use are [ and ] to select keyframes before and after current frame (inclusive), respectively, and Ctrl-K to select all keyframe in current frame. I don't know what's negative in your experience, but relying on manual single selection and border select sure is error-prone.

selection methods

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In the Dopesheet, you can select keyframes with box select (B). Then, you can move them (G) and type in the number of frames (ex. 47 or -47), resize them (S), or duplicate them (Shift + D). Keying Numpad . will zoom in on selected keyframes.

After pressing the keystrokes, you should move the mouse to position the keyframes. The position of the timeline selector matters, and acts like an origin or pivot point.

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protected by cegaton May 26 '18 at 20:40

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