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I am following this YouTube video tutorial. I believe the tutorial uses version 2.67 and I am using version 2.79.

In the tutorial, only two opposing edges of a plane are selected, and afterwards, when it does three successive subdivides, the plane is subdivided in only one direction (between the opposing edges), like so:

enter image description here

But when I do the same, I get unwanted additional cross divides in the perpendicular direction, like so:

enter image description here

How can I get subdivides in only one direction between the original two edges?

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    $\begingroup$ Place your cursor near the edge you prefer. Use CTRL + "R" for "Loop Cuts". The mouse wheel will control the quantity. Then Left click and the right click. $\endgroup$
    – Dontwalk
    Feb 24, 2018 at 16:35
  • $\begingroup$ I don't get that with W > Subdivide operator in 2.79. Subdivision will work only with border edges opposed to each other if there aren't any loops in the middle (which doesn't seem to be the case). If there are edges in the middle select whole rings of edges and subdivide. Probably there was something else selected $\endgroup$
    – Mr Zak
    Feb 24, 2018 at 16:40
  • $\begingroup$ @Dontwalk Awesome! It worked. Is this a work-around, or has there been a change in the UI since the older version? $\endgroup$
    – Sabuncu
    Feb 24, 2018 at 16:41
  • $\begingroup$ It is not a work-around. Loop Cuts are a very useful tool. docs.blender.org/manual/en/dev/modeling/meshes/editing/… $\endgroup$
    – Dontwalk
    Feb 24, 2018 at 16:45
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    $\begingroup$ I do not see any problem in doing this either with Subdivide or Loopcut operators in recent 2.79 version. Subdivide can be better in some circumstances and there doesn't seem to be any need to use older version of Blender. The only thing I see changed is that it selects what it subdivided $\endgroup$
    – Mr Zak
    Feb 24, 2018 at 18:08

1 Answer 1

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Hmm. I did some testing. That video tutorial is from 2013 so the creater of that tutorial must have most likely been using blender 2.61 or 2.62 or 2.63 as that was the latest at that point of time.

When I downloaded and ran blender 2.61 the subdivide behaved like it did in the video. So this implies that something changed in blender since 2013. Since 2013 a lot has changed.

The subdivide behaviour you get now is the correct behaviour as per the latest blender. The older blender subdivided in one direction.

I would advice you use edge loops like suggested by Dontwalk earlier i.e. with Ctrl + R shortcut to slice in one direction.

Alternatively download and use blender 2.61/2.62/2.63 to follow along with that tutorial.

Older versions of blender can be obtained here https://download.blender.org/release/. The date of release of those blender versions is also mentioned there. (Note: these versions are no longer supported -- use at own risk).

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for taking the time to investigate this. As you mentioned as well, I think I will be using the edge loop method. $\endgroup$
    – Sabuncu
    Feb 24, 2018 at 19:38

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